Let’s Prep for Extended School Year

Hey! If you are reading this post, you are probably heading into Extended School Year (ESY) too! This is my fifth year working ESY and while I always dread it a bit as ESY approaches, I am usually happy that I worked it. ESY is more relaxed with a summer camp feel. I love being able to stay connected with a few of my students during the summer. Some districts have more intense ESY programs than others, but for me, it is just a couple of hours, just a few days a week to help me keep a little bit of a schedule during the summer.

Here is how I get ready for ESY each year!

Image Description: Let's plan for Extended School Year 1. Review your caseload list and confirm their ESY service delivery.⁣
2. Read each students' most recent progress report and objectives. Check-in with the primary SLP if you can.⁣
3. Group children with similar goals and create a workable schedule. ⁣
4. Input students, objectives, and schedule into autopopulating data forms and print for the duration of the ESY program.⁣
5. Determine what specialized materials you need to borrow from the primary SLP or pull from your own resources.⁣
6. Loosely map out each week of ESY. Themes can be helpful to keep you organized and minimize materials.

If you are interested in checking out the autopopulating data sheets, you can grab your copy here in the freebie library.

These are the themes I decided on for this year! And I already have a free one-page guide for each theme with books, articles, videos, songs, games, apps, play, and no-print resources so you are ready to tackle Extended School Year. Grab the themed speech therapy idea guides in my freebie library here.

Let me know if you are working Extended School Year this year!

Thanks for reading!

May Therapy Plans

Happy May!

Head on over to my freebie library to download your copy of the May Speech Therapy Ideas Guide with clickable links to picture books, articles, web-based games, videos, songs & Seldom Speechless resources. Includes activities great for teletherapy or in-person and best for preschool & elementary-aged kiddos!

Thanks for reading!

April Therapy Plans

Happy April!

Spring is in full swing over in my neck of the woods! A bird is building its nest on my front door wreath and I am research how to grow a vegetable garden!

I am going to bring all this spring energy into my speech therapy sessions this month!

Head on over to my freebie library to download your copy of the April Speech Therapy Ideas sheet with clickable links to picture books, articles, web-based games, videos, songs & Seldom Speechless resources. Includes activities great for teletherapy or in-person and best for preschool & elementary-aged kiddos!

Thanks for reading!

Video Modeling: How do I use it?

Three Types of Videos

  1. Video Peer-Modeling: Video of a peer completing the routine. Students attend best to video models that share similar characteristics to themselves (Bellini & Akullian, 2007).
  2. Video Self-Modeling: Video of the student completing the routine. Videos depicting the targeted student must only show successful attempts of the targeted skill. Strategic taping and editing must be used to show the child successfully completing the routine (Bellini & Akullian, 2007).
  3. Video Perspective-Modeling: Video of a routine filmed from the perspective of the student.

Check out an example of video perspective-modeling here.

Phases of Intervention

Phase 1

Introduce the edited video of the desired skill to your student by first simply playing it in the student’s presence—no expectations or demands at first.

Phase 2

Watch the video with the student. You can either listen to the embedded audio or mute the videos and speak your own simplified narration as the routine plays. It can be helpful to pair steps of the video with visual icons to provide greater visually cued instruction. After viewing the video model, practice the skill through discrete practice sessions or role-playing (this is the production process of observational learning). Offer prompts, cues, immediate models, and redirection as needed for the student to be successful.

Phase 3

Consistently watch the appropriate video before completing a targeted routine to ensure sufficient exposure to the model. Each time the student completes the routine fade prompts and cues to scaffold to independence. As the student becomes more successful with the routine periodically review the video models as professionally determined.

A Note About Motivation

Encourage the student attend to the videos using verbal redirection cues but remember attention is not a prerequisite skill for learning and research has indicated modeling and frequent exposure are sufficient to support learning without hand-over-hand assistance and use of external reinforcers or punishments (D’Ateno, Mangiapanello, & Taylor, 2003).

Thanks for reading!